MBBS3 Tips & FAQ

Welcome to the FAQ page for MBBS3. For other years please look here.

Ask any questions below that you have on the exams! Also leave your tips on the year, for students to come and answer other people's questions.

A full list of useful textbooks used can be found at the bottom of this post. I recommend borrowing them over purchasing them. That said, I get money if you use purchase them through the Amazon links below (which helps fund the website/apps/books). Thanks guys!

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Writtens:

I would begin the year by using mini Kumar & Clark to understand what happens in each disease. However, I noticed that a large focus of the questions were on diagnostic criteria, gold standard investigations and management which is covered best by Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine (a.k.a cheese & onion). Do not start with the Oxford Handbook, as this book doesn't explain things thus it may leave you very confused.

For Psychiatry, I recommend Psychiatry PRN, written by the same person who runs Extreme Psychiatry. It is genuinaly an amazing book for Rotation B. For Neurology, I recommend a MCQ booklet I wrote. For data interpretation, particularly during the Chest and Abdo rotations, I recommend this book which covers it brilliantly!

Whilst these books may feel too light, the emphasis is consolidating your clinical skills in MBBS3. Nevertheless, if you like extra detail use the Lecture Note series in AbdominalCardiologyNeurology and Respiratory medicine. Remember the emphasis is on common conditions, so know these inside out.

OSCEs:

Masterpass and Macleod's are the best textbooks to use. Masterpass is not sufficient to pass as it has insufficient detail and occasional mistakes. Macleod's however is very good in that it details clinical findings and really explains what they mean. Also, I recommend this website or my OSCE Android app (I'm obviously biased), as it covers most of the potential stations in the OSCE.

Histories
  • You will usually be asked to give differentials (aim for at least three) and to support your top differential. This usually happens at the warning bell (but occasionally at the end)
  • Aim to ask about ideas, concerns and expectations EARLY in the consultation. These open questions will often get patients to really convey what they've presented for
  • You should NOT be asked for management steps i.e. investigations or treatment, except in the Pathology & Therapeutic stations
  • If a patient is presenting to A&E, strongly consider that this may be an emergency diagnosis. In contrast, if a patient is presenting to the GP, this may be a long term issue
  • Spend the vignette time thinking of differentials for a given presenting complaint in this age & gender. Try to split them into different systems (cardiovascular/respiratory/abdominal/other causes). 
  • Always consider emergencies or malignancies as a cause, asking the relevant red flags to rule these in and out!
  • Ruling things in/out and being safe are much more important than getting the diagnosis. In fact, you can get the right diagnosis and fail a station
  • They usually ask for differentials towards the end. When practising, try to pretend to have signs or list the things you'd expect for a given diagnosis
  • Remember that patients will be presenting with stable diagnoses, do not suggest someone has acute appendicitis
  • Say what you actually see/feel/hear. Doing it correctly is much more important than getting the diagnosis at this stage! 
  • Always introduce yourself and wash your hands before & after. These are important and easy marks
Procedures (e.g. venepuncture)
  • It is generally better in my opinion to imagine there is an actual patient as this makes you more likely to remember the steps
  • Always introduce yourself and wash your hands before & after. These are important and easy marks

For information on each book, hover over the book and read my comments!


If you don't see a list of books above, you may need to disable your ad blocker. Finally if you have any questions, please just ask below!

10 comments

comments
Anonymous
12 April 2016 at 11:49 delete

Hi, I know you've made your own clinical neurology question booklet, but what practice questions would you recommend for abdo and chest ?
Thanks

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12 April 2016 at 21:24 delete

Would be best to message me directly as I have a few other resources I could send you. I would recommend against onexamination and pastest (which are way too difficult). Even my own clinical neurology looks at the toughest possible questions. There isn't a list of questions I have found so far that I have liked, feeling that the best yield comes from looking at King's own lectures and the textbooks I've discussed above. If you have any suggestions though, happy to look at the questions and tell you if I feel it is accurate!

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Anonymous
15 May 2016 at 17:14 delete

To what extent should you take a history in the peripheral vascular exam?
What questions should you ask?

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15 May 2016 at 17:45 delete

Hi! I've listed the questions I'd suggest on the mark sheets. If you have any further questions please do let me know!

http://osce-stations.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/peripheral-vascular-exam.html

http://osce-stations.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/arterial-exam.html

http://osce-stations.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/venous-exam.html

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Anonymous
31 May 2016 at 17:03 delete

Hi!

Do we have to read the WHOLE Kumar and Clark chapter for haematology? Or is there just specific diseases we have to know?

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31 May 2016 at 17:16 delete

As with the whole course, spend your time proportionately. Haematology is a relatively small part of the course and the amount you need to know is dictated by the lectures. Know the common stuff inside out such as DVTs & PEs, anaemias and sickle cell disease. Know how to recognise the other conditions reading over them briefly. If you go in thinking "What do I need to know to be a safe FY1 & 2/GP then you're going about it perfectly (and would even be sufficient for final year). Of course there will always be extremely hard questions that only a handful will know. Feel free to ask further questions if you need more clarification!

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Anonymous
12 September 2016 at 10:53 delete

Hi, you're website it great! I was wondering whether you thought that students without clinical partners are at a disadvantage? Best wishes.

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12 September 2016 at 18:33 delete

Brilliant question! The answer very much depends on your personality and the others in your firm. It's likely that someone else with no clinical partner will be with you - which means you can work together if needed. It also depends very much on your personality: if you're not shy about going and seeing patients and getting things done then you'll excel as you won't be sharing clinical opportunities with someone else. I definitely don't think you're at a disadvantage however to benefit you will have to take the initiative more. Personally I didn't have a clinical partner at all for in 3-5th years.

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Anonymous
10 April 2017 at 21:47 delete

Hi Akashh, just bought your clinical neurology book in the run up to exams! Just wondering what your opinion is being in a peripheral like Medway without a clinical parter for the last term of 4th year. I've heard lots of rumours how its best to be in London for the last term as it's ideal for revision. What do you think of this? Thanks

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10 April 2017 at 23:03 delete

I've heard brilliant things about Medway and I managed without a clinical partner and actually ended up having more people to work with as well as learning a lot more! I think you should capitalise on all the opportunities it'll bring :) and thank you! If I can be of any help, drop me a message :)

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